Eclipse
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       =======  Understanding Hinduism  =======

Eclipse

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Eclipses during 2014
(UT = Universal Time or Greenwich mean time)

A total of 4 eclipses occur in the year 2014.
There are 2 solar eclipses and 2 lunar  eclipses.

2014

 

 

 

15-04-2014

29-04-2014

08-10-2014

23-10-2014

Lunar Total

Solar Annular

Lunar Total

Solar partial

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A total of 4 eclipses occur in the year 2015..
There are 2 solar eclipses and 2 lunar  eclipses.

2015

 

 

 

20-03-2015

04-04-2015

13-09-2015

28-09-2015

Solar Total

Lunar Total

Solar Partial

Lunar Total

 

 

 

 

 

A total of 5 eclipses occur in the year 2016..
There are 2 solar eclipses and 3 lunar  eclipses.

2016

 

 

 

 

08-09-March 2016

23-03-2016

18-08-2016

01-09-2016

16-09-2016

Solar Total

Lunar Total

Solar Partial

Lunar Total

Lunar Penumbral

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Solar Eclipses 2003 to 2035

Eclipses of the Moon2010-2020

COSMIC INFLUENCE ON WATER

Wheat grains that used water that was shaken during the solar eclipse had a stunted growth

Water appears to act as the Earth's sensory organ for the cosmic cycles. We all know how the tides react to the moon's phases, and Dr. Theodor Scwen has investigated the subtle effects of the cosmos on water, and has clearly showed the variations in water respond to changes in planetary constellation

He found that moving water acts as a receiver, while still water preserves the received information. In his experiments he shook water at regular intervals, before solar eclipse, throughout (during solar eclipse) and after a solar eclipse. He found that wheat grains that used water shaken during the solar eclipse had a stunted growth, whereas the growth were normal when with use of the water that was shaken before and after the solar eclipse. (Other experiments afterwards confirmed this correlation of plant growth and planetary constellation).

.Lawrence Edwards had also carried out fascinating work on how the shape of tree and flower buds change their shape as the planetary alignments change. For example the planet Mars influences the oak, Venus the birch, the cherry is influenced by the Sun, etc .In the same manner, water is highly susceptible to changes in the cosmic constellation. It is receptive to cosmic influence and conveys its information to all living organisms, because they are all largely composed of water. 

Eclipses in Astrology
By Jon
(Extracts)

Every thing in astrology is a cycle and eclipses are no different, an
eclipse will return to same sign and house approximately every
18 years and the opposite sign and house every nine years.
So if you want to get a heads up on what this year's eclipses mean,
think about what was going on in your life nine years ago in 2001
and 18 years ago in 1992. For example maybe the 2001 eclipses
hit your 4th/10th axis and you bought a new home, started a family
or started a new job. So maybe this year, similar domestic and career
issues will come into sharp focus.

The house position of the eclipse is important especially if the eclipse
hits a planet in that house. If the eclipse hits the 1st/7th house axis
it emphasizes the polarity between individuality and relationships, and
at these times relationships are often either made or broken. If the
eclipse hits the 2nd/8th axis it emphasizes the polarity between
personal values and resources and the deep intimacy of shared values
and resources. Self worth issues and money issues are highlighted
during this time.

Here are the dates of upcoming eclipses during 2010 so you can
test them out for yourself.

Solar Eclipse — Jan 15, 2010 — 25 Capricorn 01
Lunar Eclipse — Jun 26, 2010 — 04 Capricorn p46
Solar Eclipse — Jul 11, 2010 — 19 Cancer 24
Lunar Eclipse — Dec 21, 2010 — 29 Gemini 21

First of all for an eclipse to occur, the Sun and Moon have to be in
conjunction or opposition (i.e. New or Full Moon); and this New or
Full Moon must be within 18 degrees and 31 minutes of the Moon's
nodes. The easy way to figure out when an eclipse will occur is look
to the signs (always opposite) the transiting North Node and South
Node are in. When the Sun makes its annual visit to those signs
(six months part) and forms a conjunction or opposition with the
Moon, that's when the eclipse will occur. For example, this year
(2008) they are in the signs Aquarius (North Node) and Leo
(South Node); so at the New and Full Moons in February and
August, there will be an eclipse. There are between 4-6 eclipses
in a calendar year.

The solar eclipse (which occurs at the New Moon) happens when
the Moon is located between the Earth and Sun. Solar eclipses,
like a regular New Moon, signify a new beginning or a new
direction unfolding. The lunar or Full Moon eclipse occurs when
the Earth is located between the Sun and Moon, and, like a Full
Moon, it signifies a time of conclusion, fruition, climax or culmination.
An eclipse from an astrological perspective is a super-duper New
or Full Moon.

If you pay attention to the news around the time of an eclipse you
will probably notice an increase in newsworthy stories. On a
personal level the big events in life often happen when an eclipse
makes a tight conjunction, opposition or square to a natal planet or
point. Of course you want to tie the information the eclipse gives
with the current transits, secondary progressions and solar arc
directions for a clearer picture. An eclipse by itself might not mean
much, but if there is also a major transit and progression happening,
reemphasizing what the eclipse is saying, then you know it's going to
be powerful.

A transiting planet can symbolize an event by activating the eclipse
degree well before or after the actual eclipse takes place. Sandra
Leigh says, "an event associated with the eclipse can be experienced
one year before and up to two years after." So if you have an eclipse
make an exact conjunction to an important planet or point in your
chart, it's going to be important. Even if it's not immediately clear
what the meaning is, it might take time for a transiting planet to
activate it.

 

To find current time in all countries and all major cities, click below
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/
http://www.worldtimeserver.com/

Some tips for aspiring solar eclipse viewers

Important warning
Permanent eye damage can result from staring or
even looking at the disk of the Sun directly

Future Total Solar Eclipses (2003 - 2035)

UT  Universal Time Definition

Eclipse Special Observances

To find current time in all countries and all major cities, click below

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/
http://www.worldtimeserver.com/

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Some tips for aspiring solar eclipse viewers

Important Warning

Permanent eye damage can result from staring or even looking at the disk of the Sun directly, or through a camera viewfinder, or with binoculars or a telescope even when only a thin crescent of the Sun remains. The 1 percent of the Sun's surface still visible is about 10,000 times brighter than the full moon. Staring at the Sun under such circumstances have the same effect on the retina of your eyes than a magnifying glass to focus sunlight onto paper, and eventually burning a hole in it! The retina is delicate and irreplaceable. There is little or nothing a retinal surgeon will be able to do to help you. Never look at the Sun outside of the total phase of an eclipse unless you have adequate protection. Remember, your eyes can be damaged without you feeling any pain.

Once the Sun is entirely eclipsed, however, its bright surface is hidden from view and it is completely safe to look directly at the totally eclipsed Sun without any filters. In fact, it is one of the greatest sights in nature.

When selecting a filter with which to view the sun directly, make sure that the filter’s optical thickness is adequate that only a minuscule fraction of the sun’s light is transmitted.  You should be able to view the filament of a high-intensity electric lamp comfortably through your filter.  Aluminised polyester, fully exposed and developed black-and-white film (i.e. still containing the silver coating) or welder’s glass, will do.  The secret is to have metal in your filter absorbing the excess sunlight.  An optical thickness of 5.0 (i.e. only allowing 0.01% of the light) is adequate.

When using any kind of filter, however, do not stare for long periods at the Sun. Look through the filter briefly and then look away. Intuitively, one knows that it is possible to glance at the Sun and immediately look away without eye-damage.

Take care, and have enjoyable and safe solar eclipse viewing!
Danie Esterhuyse
South African Weather Service.

________________

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There are four types of solar eclipses:
By Fred Espenak

Partial - Moon's penumbral shadow traverses Earth (umbral and antumbral shadows completely miss Earth)
Annular - Moon's antumbral shadow traverses Earth (Moon is too far from Earth to completely cover the Sun)
Total - Moon's umbral shadow traverses Earth (Moon is close enough to Earth to completely cover the Sun)
Hybrid - Moon's umbral and antumbral shadows traverse Earth (eclipse appears annular and total along different sections of its path). Hybrid eclipses are also known as annular-total eclipses.
he number of solar eclipses in a single year can range from 2 to 5. Nearly 3/4 of the time there are 2 eclipses in a year. On the other hand, it is quite rare to have 5 solar eclipse in a single year. The last time it happened was in 1935 and the next time is 2206.

n eclipse of the Sun (or solar eclipse) can only occur at New Moon when the Moon passes between Earth and Sun. If the Moon's shadow falls upon Earth's surface, we see some portion of the Sun's disk covered or 'eclipsed' by the Moon. Since New Moon occurs every 29 1/2 days, you might think that we should have a solar eclipse about once a month. Unfortunately, this doesn't happen because the Moon's orbit around Earth is tilted 5 degrees to Earth's orbit around the Sun. As a result, the Moon's shadow usually misses Earth as it passes above or below our planet at New Moon. At lease twice each year, the geometry lines up just right so that an eclipse of the Sun is seen from some part of Earth.

he Moon's shadow has three parts two of which are nested inside the third. The faint outer shadow is the penumbra. Partial eclipses are visible inside the penumbral shadow. The dark inner shadow is the umbra. Total eclipses are seen in the umbral shadow. The umbra is cone-shaped and narrows to a point. Extending beyond the umbra is the antumbra.

Total Solar Eclipses 2003 - 2035

Please Note: Partial Solar Eclipses are not listed

Date Maximum
Duration
(min.sec)
Maximum
path width
miles
Visible from
2003 Nov 23 1:57 308 Antarctica
2005 Apr 8 4:31 100 S. Pacific Ocean
2006 MAR 29 4:6 114 Africa, Turkey, Kazakhstan, Russia
2008 AUG 1 2:27 147 Greenland, Russia, China
2009 JUL 22 6:38 160 India, China, Pacific Ocean
2010 JUL 11 5:20 160 S. Pacific Ocean, southern tip of South America
2012 NOV 13 4:02 111 Australia, Pacific Ocean
2013 NOV 3* 1:39 35 Atlantic Ocean, central Africa
2015 MAR 20 2:46 287 N. Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian Sea, Svalbard
2016 MAR 9 4:09 96 Indonesia, N. Pacific Ocean
2017 AUG 21 2:40 71 United States (from Oregon to South Carolina)
2019 JUL 2 4:32 124 S. Pacific Ocean, Chile, Argentina
2020 DEC 14 2:09 56 Chile, Argentina
2021 DEC 4 1:54 260 Antarctica
2023 APR 20* 1:16 30 Indonesia
2024 APR 8 4:28 122 Mexico, United States, Canada
2026 AUG 12 2:18 182 Greenland, Iceland, Spain
2027 AUG 2 6:22 160 Gibraltar, N. Africa, Saudi Arabia
2028 JUL 22 5:09 143 Indian Ocean, Australia, New Zealand
2030 NOV 25 3:43 105 S. Africa, Indian Ocean, Australia
2031 NOV 14* 1:08 24 Pacific Ocean
2033 MAR 30 2:37 483 Alaska, Arctic Ocean
2034 MAR 20 4:09 99 Central Africa, Middle East
2035 SEP 2 2:54 72 China, N. Korea, Japan, Pacific Ocean

 

________________

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Introduction to Lunar Eclipse
By Fred Espenak (c) 2007

An eclipse of the Moon (or lunar eclipse) can only occur at Full Moon, and only if the Moon passes through some portion of the Earth's shadow. The shadow is actually composed of two cone-shaped components, one nested inside the other. The outer or penumbral shadow is a zone where the Earth blocks part but not all of the Sun's rays from reaching the Moon. In contrast, the inner or umbral shadow is a region where the Earth blocks all direct sunlight from reaching the Moon.
There are three types of lunar eclipses:

    1. Penumbral - The Moon passes through Earth's penumbral shadow. These pale eclipses are faint and hard to see.
    2. Partial - A portion of the Moon passes through Earth's umbral shadow. These are easy to see with the unaided eye.
    3. Total - The entire Moon passes through Earth's umbral shadow. The Moon can turn orange, red or dark brown.

When an eclipse of the Moon takes place, everyone on the night side of Earth can see it. About 35% of all eclipses are of the penumbral type which are very difficult to detect, even with a telescope. Another 30% are partial eclipses which are easy to see with the unaided eye. The final 35% or so are total eclipses, and these are quite extrordinary events to behold.

Eclipses of the Moon

Eclipse Type/ Umbral Magnitude/
Eclipse Duration/Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility
.
Geographic abreviations : n = north, s = south, e = east, w = west, c = central

 

 

Eclipses of the Moon: 2010 - 2020

Date

Eclipse Type

Umbral Magnitude

Duration partial phase

Duration total phase

Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility

2010 Jun 26

Partial

0.537

02h43m

 

e Asia, Aus., Pacific, w Americas

2010 Dec 21

Total

1.256

03h29m

01h12m

e Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas, Europe

2011 Jun 15

Total

1.700

03h39m

01h40m

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2011 Dec 10

Total

1.106

03h32m

00h51m

Europe, e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific, N.A.

2012 Jun 04

Partial

0.370

02h07m

 

Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas

2012 Nov 28

Penumbral

-0.187

_

_

Europe, e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific, N.A.

2013 Apr 25

Partial

0.015

00h27m

 

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2013 May 25

Penumbral

-0.934

_

_

Americas, Africa

2013 Oct 18

Penumbral

-0.272

_

_

Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia

2014 Apr 15

Total

1.291

03h35m

01h18m

Aus., Pacific, Americas

2014 Oct 08

Total

1.166

03h20m

00h59m

Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas

2015 Apr 04

Total

1.001

03h29m

00h05m

Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas

2015 Sep 28

Total

1.276

03h20m

01h12m

e Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa, w Asia

2016 Mar 23

Penumbral

-0.312

_

_

Asia, Aus., Pacific, w Americas

2016 Sep 16

Penumbral

-0.064

_

_

Aus., Pacific, Americas

2017 Feb 11

Penumbral

-0.035

_

_

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus., w Pacific

2017 Aug 07

Partial

0.246

01h55m

 

Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia

2018 Jan 31

Total

1.315

03h23m

01h16m

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2018 Jul 27

Total

1.609

03h55m

01h43m

Asia, Aus., Pacific, w N.America

2019 Jan 21

Total

1.195

03h17m

01h02m

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2019 Jul 16

Partial

0.653

02h58m

 

c Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa

2020 Jan 10

Penumbral

-0.116

_

_

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2020 Jun 05

Penumbral

-0.405

_

_

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2020 Jul 05

Penumbral

-0.644

_

_

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2020 Nov 30

Penumbral

-0.262

_

_

Americas, sw Europe, Africa

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Eclipse Special Observances

The Legend

When the gods and the demons churned the milky ocean in days of yore, nectar came out of it. Lord Vishnu assumed the form of Mohini, a charming lady, deluded the demons and distributed the nectar only among the gods. But Rahu had disguised himself as a god. The sun and the moon pointed this out to Mohini who immediately slashed off the demon’s head. Since the nectar had by then already reached up to the neck, he did not die. Thus the head came to be known as Rahu and the body as Ketu. To avenge this betrayal, Rahu and Ketu periodically eclipse the sun and the moon.

Astronomically speaking, when the sun, the moon and the earth are all in line, with the moon or the earth at the centre, a solar or lunar eclipse takes place respectively.

At the time of the eclipse, people bathe in the sacred rivers. They do charitable acts. They give cows, money and gold. The day after the eclipse they feed the poor, the Brahmins and the Sadhus. After the eclipse they clean their houses, vessels, etc., and take a bath before they start cooking.

One should not take food during the eclipse. When the eclipse begins the food should by then have been digested. One should take food only after seeing the sun or the moon free from the eclipse. When the clear sun or the moon is not seen before sunset or sunrise, in the case of the solar and lunar eclipse respectively, food can be taken only after the sun or the moon is seen the next day.

Pregnant women should not see the sun or the moon during the time of the eclipse. If they do the child born may have some kind of defect. He may be born deaf, dumb or blind. Householders are forbidden from sexual intercourse on the day of the eclipse, for the same reason.

At this time one should take great care in avoiding bleeding, scorpion stings, etc. These have disastrous results. Even an earthworm has a poisonous effect when it bites one during an eclipse.

Those who do Japa at the time of the eclipse derive great benefits. The effect of Japa and Sankirtan during the eclipse contributes towards relieving the suffering of humanity and also of the planets. These people receive the blessings of the gods. They attain perfection quickly. Those who wish to tap the subtle force locked in the Mantra that will cure scorpion stings should stand in water and repeat the appropriate Mantra.

The little intellect cannot understand many things in this universe. Hence, have faith in the words of sages.

Ignorance has eclipsed Self-knowledge. However, this eclipse will disappear. You will shine in your own glory. This is the spiritual significance of the eclipse.

On the day of the eclipse, what is known as Tabij, can be made from Bhoja Patra. Upon it words are written using as ink, Ashta-gandha or Kesar or Kasturi. After folding, it is tied with cotton thread. Using diya and dhoop for puja the Tabij is powered (made potent) with Mantras. Tabij that is prepared during the actual time of eclipse is most powerful and potent. Many types of Tabij are used, for business or profession, health, wealth- prosperity, success in exams, jobs, marriage, romance, successful outcome of court cases, revenge, etc. Wrap the Tabij with a red cloth or place in a copper container and keep for two-three years. Detailed information can be had from learned pundits.
________________

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UT   Universal Time Definition

Universal Time or UT is the precise measure of time used as the basis for all civil time-keeping. Although their exact definitions differ, most readers can assume that Universal Time is equivalent to Greenwich Mean Time or GMT. Universal Time is actually based on the mean sidereal time as measured in Greenwich, England. It's also approximately equal to mean solar time from Greenwich.

Like most other astronomical calculations, eclipse predictions are usually presented in terms of Universal Time. In order to convert eclipse predictions from UT to local time, you need to know what time zone you are in.

Universal time (UT) is simply the number of hours, minutes, and seconds which have elapsed since midnight(when the sun is at a longitude of 180°) in the Greenwich time zone.

"UT" is an abbreviation for Universal Time, a time standard commonly used by astronomers. Observers of comets or meteor showers typically convert their time of observation to UT and then submit their observations to various organizations. These organizations can then compare observations by people from different states or countries to properly study the behaviour of a comet or a meteor shower.
The Comets and Meteor Showers web site is a tool frequently used by amateur and professional astronomers and therefore, whenever possible, times are given in UT. For non-astronomers, conversion is fairly easy using the table below. All you need to know is your time zone. If your state or country enforces daylight savings time you will need to add an additional hour to the times below.

Standard Time Zone UT

Time Zone Take UT and
add the following
International Date Line East (IDLE) New Zealand Standard Time (NZST) New Zealand Time (NZT) +12 hours
Guam Standard Time (GST) East Australian Standard Time (EAST) +10 hours
Japan Standard Time (JST +9 hours
China Coast Time (CCT) + 8 hrs
West Australian Standard Time (WAST)   + 7 hrs
India Standard Time (IST) + 5.5 hrs
Russian Zone 3 + 4 hrs
Baghdad Time (BT) Russian Zone 2 + 3 hrs
Eastern European Time (EET) Russian Zone 1 + 2 hrs
Central European Time (CET) Middle European Time (MET) Swedish Winter Time (SWT) + 1 hr
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) Universal Time (UT) Western European Time (WET) 0 hrs
West African Time (WAT) -1 hr
Atlantic Standard Time (AST) -4 hrs
Eastern Standard Time (EST) -5 hrs
Central Standard Time (CST) -6 hrs
Mountain Standard Time (MST) -7 hrs
Pacific Standard Time (PST) -8 hrs
Alaskan Standard Time (AkST) -9 hrs
Hawaiian Standard Time (HST) -10 hrs
International Date Line West (IDLW) -12 hrs

To find current time in all countries and all major cities, click below

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/
http://www.worldtimeserver.com/
================
Related articles

Moon Calendar 2009
Hindu Festivals 2031
Hindu Festivals 2032 to 2043

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Eclipses of the Moon: 2010 - 2020

Date

Eclipse Type

Umbral Magnitude

Duration partial phase

Duration total phase

Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility

2010 Jun 26

Partial

0.537

02h43m

 

e Asia, Aus., Pacific, w Americas

2010 Dec 21

Total

1.256

03h29m

01h12m

e Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas, Europe

2011 Jun 15

Total

1.700

03h39m

01h40m

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2011 Dec 10

Total

1.106

03h32m

00h51m

Europe, e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific, N.A.

2012 Jun 04

Partial

0.370

02h07m

 

Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas

2012 Nov 28

Penumbral

-0.187

_

_

Europe, e Africa, Asia, Aus., Pacific, N.A.

2013 Apr 25

Partial

0.015

00h27m

 

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2013 May 25

Penumbral

-0.934

_

_

Americas, Africa

2013 Oct 18

Penumbral

-0.272

_

_

Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia

2014 Apr 15

Total

1.291

03h35m

01h18m

Aus., Pacific, Americas

2014 Oct 08

Total

1.166

03h20m

00h59m

Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas

2015 Apr 04

Total

1.001

03h29m

00h05m

Asia, Aus., Pacific, Americas

2015 Sep 28

Total

1.276

03h20m

01h12m

e Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa, w Asia

2016 Mar 23

Penumbral

-0.312

_

_

Asia, Aus., Pacific, w Americas

2016 Sep 16

Penumbral

-0.064

_

_

Aus., Pacific, Americas

2017 Feb 11

Penumbral

-0.035

_

_

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus., w Pacific

2017 Aug 07

Partial

0.246

01h55m

 

Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia

2018 Jan 31

Total

1.315

03h23m

01h16m

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2018 Jul 27

Total

1.609

03h55m

01h43m

Asia, Aus., Pacific, w N.America

2019 Jan 21

Total

1.195

03h17m

01h02m

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2019 Jul 16

Partial

0.653

02h58m

 

c Pacific, Americas, Europe, Africa

2020 Jan 10

Penumbral

-0.116

_

_

S.America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2020 Jun 05

Penumbral

-0.405

_

_

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2020 Jul 05

Penumbral

-0.644

_

_

Europe, Africa, Asia, Aus.

2020 Nov 30

Penumbral

-0.262

_

_

Americas, sw Europe, Africa

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